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lichens crocheted from lichen-dyed wool

  • 07 Feb 2024 10:58 AM
    Message # 13312029

    Years ago, I taught Hannah Prather at Siskiyou Field Institute in several lichen classes. She has continued work in lichens around Portland, and now has a temporary job at Reed, teaching Reed's first lichenology class,  LICHENS of the Pacific Northwest! She asked me to come and dye lichens with her students. One group was so excited about the dyes that they crocheted lichens with their dyed yarn.

    Look at the photo 167448611#photo and see if you can identify the lichens they portray! The orange and black are not lichen dyed, though I see a bit of yellow that could be from Letharia. The brown color is actually more purple and is from Umbilicaria, the greenish is more blueish and is from Evernia.

    The crochet artists are Cadence Price and Natalie Santoro.


    Last modified: 07 Feb 2024 11:02 AM | daphne stone
  • 08 Feb 2024 8:46 AM
    Reply # 13312561 on 13312029

    I see Usnea, Hypogymnia, Xanthoria, Physconia and Umbilicaria. How did I do? 

  • 08 Feb 2024 10:00 AM
    Reply # 13312611 on 13312029

    In BC Canada, some First Nations people's reports of traditional use of lichens used as dyes, Lobaria pulmonaria for example, include a request not to use lichens any more due to the need for large amounts to produce small amounts of dye...not recognized as conservation friendly 

  • 09 Feb 2024 9:45 AM
    Reply # 13313195 on 13312029

    Good point, Chris. I have felt and taught that it is OK to use small amounts of lichens for dyeing if the lichens have fallen from their substrate and won't survive. Although this may take from what wildlife might eat, they are able to find fresher lichens ON the substrate, so probably does not make a great impact.


    I agree, however, that this is not a resource to use for commercial dyeing!

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