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Micarea - difficulty in IDing to species

  • 14 Apr 2020 9:06 AM
    Message # 8899237

    I am an amateur lichenologist that is helping the wildlife biologist for the Red Rock Ranger District, Coconino National Forest in doing a lichen survey.  


    The specimen I collected was found on a North facing slope growing on detritus, soil, and moss.  I believe it is Micarea, but the lichen key for this area (Lichen Flora of the Greater Sonoran Desert Region) has led to a dead end.  Key characteristics are a brownish hymenium,  simple hyaline ellipsoid spores (8-10 x 4-6 microns), with all spot tests negative with the exception of the epihymenium being N+ violet.  Further the thalli have cephalodia containing Nostoc.


    Any suggestions would be appreciated.



    2 files
    Last modified: 15 Apr 2020 4:06 PM | Garry Neil
  • 14 Apr 2020 9:08 AM
    Reply # 8899239 on 8899237

    Forgot to add that the area is in Arizona and the elevation is at 4,500 ft.

  • 15 Apr 2020 7:57 AM
    Reply # 8901415 on 8899237
    Bruce McCune (Administrator)

    Garry, you might check Bryobilimbia hypnorum or Mycobilimbia berengeriana. Not sure what to make of what you are calling cephalodia, since those would not be expected in these species. Perhaps they are freeliving cyanobacteria?


    On p.344 of Vol.2 of the Microlichens of the PNW there is a multi-genus key to species like this growing on soil, detritus, and moss. Most of these species look rather like your photos.



  • 15 Apr 2020 3:36 PM
    Reply # 8902313 on 8901415
    Bruce McCune wrote:

    Garry, you might check Bryobilimbia hypnorum or Mycobilimbia berengeriana. Not sure what to make of what you are calling cephalodia, since those would not be expected in these species. Perhaps they are freeliving cyanobacteria?


    On p.344 of Vol.2 of the Microlichens of the PNW there is a multi-genus key to species like this growing on soil, detritus, and moss. Most of these species look rather like your photos.



    I was thinking Micarea incrassata which does have cephalodia, but it has not been recorded in the Sonoran region.  There were little black structures on the thalli and when I examined it more closely, I found Nostoc.  However, I have examine the lichen again and there doesn't appear to be any other structures, of a similar type with Nostoc which makes be believe that it was free living


    However, I will check out your suggestions, since I am now skeptical myself of it being Micarea.  


    Thanks for your help.


     

    Last modified: 15 Apr 2020 4:55 PM | Garry Neil
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